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New "improved" Ten Commandments deceive hundreds of churches in Europe

via the telegraphUK

Churches adopt new Ten Commandments

Moses with the Ten CommandmentsHundreds of churches across the country are now preaching an updated version of the Ten Commandments, rewritten to reflect modern values.

The religious rules, which Christians believe were etched onto tablets by God and given to Moses, have been modified to use up-to-date language and principles.

Inspired by last year’s riots, the new vows include “manage your anger”, “know God” and “catch your breath” and are understood to be used in more than 600 churches in Britain.

The original “thou shalt not steal” has become “prosper with a clear conscience”, and the lengthy “thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain” becomes “take God seriously”.

The commandments, designed by popular evangelical preacher J John, have been praised by religious leaders for bringing practical advice to modern congregations.

The new DVD called “just10 for churches” Churches adopt new Ten Commandments

The new DVD called “just10 for churches”

Using short, simple language interspersed with slang, the new rules have now been released on a DVD called “just10 for churches”, aimed at providing guidance.

The tenth commandment, for example, has altered the Biblical “thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbor’s” to just “find contentment.”

“Thou shalt not commit adultery” have been edited to “affair-proof your relationships”, and “honor thy father and thy mother” has altered to “keep the peace with your parents”.

J John claims his commandments enable “everyone to understand God’s timeless principles on how we should live” and said he was inspired to write them by last summer’s riots.

He said: “Along with a lot of people I think about the way that we live nowadays and what leads people to do the sort of things that happened in the riots – whether or not we have forgotten something about a good way of living.”

The Reverend Paul Roberts, 54, vicar of St John the Evangelist in Old Coulsdon, Surrey, which dates back to 1210 AD, is among those using the new commandments.

He said: “It’s basically a way of presenting the Ten Commandments to help people connect with them in a positive way.

“Rather than just seeing them as a list of things you shouldn’t do, it is meant to help people live as God intended for our good.

“Unlike the dos and don’ts most people imagine when quizzed about the maker’s instructions, the message is meant to be both a challenge and an encouragement.”

Wayne Dulson, 40, minister of Loughton Baptist Church, Essex said: “People really engaged with the Ten Commandments in a new and fresh way.

“People now see these commandments not as a set of rules but as a template for living so that we experience God’s best for our lives.

“All ten commandments were extremely challenging, especially as the series helped us see them in the context of modern day living.

“People keep telling me how just10 has made them think much more about how they live their lives and also how much they have learnt about the commandments as they found out things they never knew before.”

Steve Jenkins, spokesman for the Church of England, said they supported new ways of communicating and added: “The Book Of Common Prayer is very clear that the faith needs to be taught afresh in every generation.”

Even former Conservative Shadow Home Secretary Ann Widdecombe, who left the Church of England after objecting to women priests, has backed J John’s rules.

“I’d say it’s not a patch on Moses but not a bad set of rules really,” she said.

“What he’s trying to do is offer a modern take on the original to explain it to a modern audience, which is fine as long as he doesn’t dispense with the original.”

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