It is so easy to get wrapped up in our daily life to the point that the future becomes a meaningless thought to us. We get up, go to work and just continue to plug along. We go to church on Sunday seeking that magic bullet that will bring peace and meaning to us in a world that seems hell bent on destroying itself. We as Christians, even while proclaiming our faith in Jesus Christ, seem to act no differently than the pagan world—chasing after material wealth and happiness in a world that is deteriorating rapidly.

We profess our faith and trust in Jesus yet continue to show by our actions that we have more faith in things of this world than in our Lord and Savior. Jesus warned us sternly of the potential evil in pursuing earthly wealth. In Matthew 6:24 Jesus said “No one can serve two masters. Either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to one and despise the other.”

Now very few of us as Christians would claim to love money and hate God—but do our actions tell us something else? Do we begin to worry when our finances get tight? Have we become slaves to our earthly desires instead of considering ourselves slaves to Jesus as the apostle Paul did?

Money and our desire for comfort and security is one of those subtle enemies that sneak into our hearts and distract us from what should be our one true love—God. And I am by no means immune to that. At times I find myself worrying about the future of my life on this planet. How will I live as I approach retirement age when the social security and medicare systems in this country are insolvent and on the verge of collapse? What starts off as diligent planning can so easily become an obsession as the enemy attempts to sow worries and doubts into my heart, taking my attention off God and placing it on myself.


What I am learning—not as quickly as I would like—is to look at things with eternal, not temporal eyes. An eternity of life awaits me when this old body breaks down and dies—where will I be spending it? In the presence of God? Or separated from him because I lived this life to serve myself and not Him?

So, you might think we don’t have to dwell on these things right now—life is still pretty comfortable for most of us. But a day may soon come when we are faced with the decision to trust in things of this world or to trust in God alone. A day may soon come when we are forced to serve God and go without things of this world; or serve the evil one so we can continue to live a life of earthly comfort.

Are we prepared for such a day? Is our faith in God solid enough to remain anchored in Him when our comfortable life on earth is challenged? Now as Christians, we will all answer “Of course!” But then we remember what God said through Jeremiah about the human heart—that it is wicked above all else. Are we truly anchored in God, or are we just fooling ourselves?

This might be a good time to ask God to reveal the depths of our hearts to see if there is anything wicked within them. Are we depending on Him? Or on our jobs and our retirement funds? Are we worried about storing up treasures for this life time or for eternity? You know, sometimes the truth hurts.