English: Church of Jesus Christ (Zion's Branch...

There can be no doubt that our nation is headed into very troubling times.  Many economists are warning that our nation is on the verge of a financial meltdown; we see immorality becoming the American way of life; and a growing number of Americans are turning their back on God and His Word, choosing their own individual path to spirituality.

Globally, Satan is moving his chess pieces in place for an attack on Israel that might result in World War Three—the war prophesied in the Book of Ezekiel–a war that might kill billions of people.   Combined with the fact that a global depression might be just around the corner, the stage will be set for the final anti-christ to emerge.

These things are inevitable, because they are foretold in the prophesies of the Bible.  We cannot stop them, but we can as a church prepare for them.  Prepare for a great harvest that will await us as people see their world crashing down around them and look for hope when they see none.  But are we ready?

The sad truth is much of Christianity is so concerned with relating with the world that we are not preparing to be the source of hope when all hell breaks loose.  With each passing day much of institutionalized Christianity looks increasingly like the world—instead of sticking out like a sore thumb.  When the world around us comes crashing down we will unfortunately look like part of the problem instead of the solution.

It’s time we take the Parable Jesus taught about the Ten Virgins seriously!  Will we be caught asleep when these things happen?  Or will we be diligent with our lamps filled with oil, watching and waiting for the opportunity that will be presented to us?  An opportunity to draw people to their only real hope—Jesus Christ?  Or will we look so much like the world that we will hardly be noticed?

The time is now for the Church in America to prepare for what is ahead of us—what is inevitable.  Will we be seen as the solution?  Or just another part of the problem?

Those who truly place their faith and trust in Jesus Christ are secure in our future—eternal life with Him.  But are we willing to endure to the end, reaching out to lost and confused people when their world collapses around them?  Or are we selfish Christians with an attitude of “Hey, I’m safe so fend for yourself”?  If that is our attitude, how can we claim to truly love Jesus—the Jesus that gave His very life for us?

These will indeed be the times that try men’s souls—and God is calling out for a faithful remnant that will endure and draw lost men on to Him.  Are we ready?  Or deep down, are we really no better than the lost around us?