Today we will spend the entire hour discussing the new Indiana Law protecting religious freedoms. It is a pivotal moment in our nation. The homosexual lobby, which touts tolerance, is being exposed anything but. But the majority of the public – and the mainstream media – hasn’t noticed.  Instead, they are calling anyone who agrees with the new legislation “Bigots” and worse.

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One Indiana business is getting death threats – not because they wouldn’t serve gay customers – but because they said they wouldn’t cater a gay wedding. Make no mistake, this pizza business was targeted by reporters because of what they are known for: A Christ-centered worldview.

In our first 20 minute segment, Wisconsin Family Action‘s Julaine Appling joins us to discuss the ramifications of the legislation, and then we will open our phone lines and hear your thoughts about what’s next for our religious freedoms. Here is the story that is rocking the nation:

The operators of a pizza restaurant in Indiana reportedly say they support the Religious Freedom Restoration Act signed into law by Gov. Mike Pence and wouldn’t be willing to cater a gay wedding.

Meanwhile, the local police department said it completed an investigation into a threat on Twitter to “burn down” the restaurant.

The owners of Memories Pizza in Walkerton, Indiana, near the border with Michigan, told ABC News’ South Bend, Indiana, affiliate WBND that they don’t support gay marriage because of their religious beliefs, adding that they would be willing to serve gay or lesbian customers who come to their restaurant, just not a wedding.

“The Walkerton Police Department is committed to extending professional police services to all in need, regardless of said person’s sexual, religious, or political views,” assistant chief of police Charles Kulp said in a statement. “We encourage all to follow Indiana Laws and Statutes. We ask that all frustrations and rebuttals with Memories Pizza’s recent media statements remain within the law.”

“If a gay couple was to come in — like say, they wanted us to provide them pizzas for a wedding, we would have to say ‘no,’” Crystal O’Connor of Memories Pizza told WBND, calling the business a “Christian establishment.”

Meanwhile, the local police department said it completed an investigation into a threat on Twitter to “burn down” the restaurant.

The owners of Memories Pizza in Walkerton, Indiana, near the border with Michigan, told ABC News’ South Bend, Indiana, affiliate WBND that they don’t support gay marriage because of their religious beliefs, adding that they would be willing to serve gay or lesbian customers who come to their restaurant, just not a wedding.

“The Walkerton Police Department is committed to extending professional police services to all in need, regardless of said person’s sexual, religious, or political views,” assistant chief of police Charles Kulp said in a statement. “We encourage all to follow Indiana Laws and Statutes. We ask that all frustrations and rebuttals with Memories Pizza’s recent media statements remain within the law.”

Kulp said the department completed an investigation into a comment on Twitter that stated, “Who’s going to Walkerton with me to burn down Memories Pizza.” That Twitter account no longer exists.

“The Walkerton Police Department has finished an investigation into this statement and submitted a case to the St. Joseph County Prosecutors office for possible charging of harassment, intimidation, and threats,” Kulp wrote in his statement.

“If a gay couple was to come in — like say, they wanted us to provide them pizzas for a wedding, we would have to say ‘no,’” Crystal O’Connor of Memories Pizza told WBND, calling the business a “Christian establishment.”

PHOTO: Crystal OConnor of Memories Pizza in Walkerton, Ind., says she supports Indianas Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

WBND PHOTO: Crystal O’Connor of Memories Pizza in Walkerton, Ind., says she supports Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

“We’re not discriminating against anyone,” O’Connor told WBND. “It’s just that’s our belief, and everybody has the right to believe in anything.

“We definitely agree with the bill,” O’Connor told WBND, referring to a state measure that prohibits state and local government from “substantially” burdening someone’s religious beliefs without a “compelling” interest.

(Source:  ABC News)


Today’s Episode:

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